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Ingo Juergensmann: Upgrade to Debian Stretch - GlusterFS fails to mount

Planet Debian - Sat, 24/06/2017 - 19:45

Before I upgrade from Jessie to Stretch everything worked as a charme with glusterfs in Debian. But after I upgraded the first VM to Debian Stretch I discovered that glusterfs-client was unable to mount the storage on Jessie servers. I got this in glusterfs log:

[2017-06-24 12:51:53.240389] I [MSGID: 100030] [glusterfsd.c:2454:main] 0-/usr/sbin/glusterfs: Started running /usr/sbin/glusterfs version 3.8.8 (args: /usr/sbin/glusterfs --read-only --fuse-mountopts=nodev,noexec --volfile-server=192.168.254.254 --volfile-id=/le --fuse-mountopts=nodev,noexec /etc/letsencrypt.sh/certs)
[2017-06-24 12:51:54.534826] E [mount.c:318:fuse_mount_sys] 0-glusterfs-fuse: ret = -1

[2017-06-24 12:51:54.534896] I [mount.c:365:gf_fuse_mount] 0-glusterfs-fuse: direct mount failed (Invalid argument) errno 22, retry to mount via fusermount
[2017-06-24 12:51:56.668254] I [MSGID: 101190] [event-epoll.c:628:event_dispatch_epoll_worker] 0-epoll: Started thread with index 1
[2017-06-24 12:51:56.671649] E [glusterfsd-mgmt.c:1590:mgmt_getspec_cbk] 0-glusterfs: failed to get the 'volume file' from server
[2017-06-24 12:51:56.671669] E [glusterfsd-mgmt.c:1690:mgmt_getspec_cbk] 0-mgmt: failed to fetch volume file (key:/le)
[2017-06-24 12:51:57.014502] W [glusterfsd.c:1327:cleanup_and_exit] (-->/usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libgfrpc.so.0(rpc_clnt_handle_reply+0x90) [0x7fbea36c4a20] -->/usr/sbin/glusterfs(mgmt_getspec_cbk+0x494) [0x55fbbaed06f4] -->/usr/sbin/glusterfs(cleanup_and_exit+0x54) [0x55fbbaeca444] ) 0-: received signum (0), shutting down
[2017-06-24 12:51:57.014564] I [fuse-bridge.c:5794:fini] 0-fuse: Unmounting '/etc/letsencrypt.sh/certs'.
[2017-06-24 16:44:45.501056] I [MSGID: 100030] [glusterfsd.c:2454:main] 0-/usr/sbin/glusterfs: Started running /usr/sbin/glusterfs version 3.8.8 (args: /usr/sbin/glusterfs --read-only --fuse-mountopts=nodev,noexec --volfile-server=192.168.254.254 --volfile-id=/le --fuse-mountopts=nodev,noexec /etc/letsencrypt.sh/certs)
[2017-06-24 16:44:45.504038] E [mount.c:318:fuse_mount_sys] 0-glusterfs-fuse: ret = -1

[2017-06-24 16:44:45.504084] I [mount.c:365:gf_fuse_mount] 0-glusterfs-fuse: direct mount failed (Invalid argument) errno 22, retry to mount via fusermount

After some searches on the Internet I found Debian #858495, but no solution for my problem. Some search results recommended to set "option rpc-auth-allow-insecure on", but this didn't help. In the end I joined #gluster on Freenode and got some hints there:

JoeJulian | ij__: debian breaks apart ipv4 and ipv6. You'll need to remove the ipv6 ::1 address from localhost in /etc/hosts or recombine your ip stack (it's a sysctl thing)
JoeJulian | It has to do with the decisions made by the debian distro designers. All debian versions should have that problem. (yes, server side).

Removing ::1 from /etc/hosts and from lo interface did the trick and I could mount glusterfs storage from Jessie servers in my Stretch VMs again. However, when I upgraded the glusterfs storages to Stretch as well, this "workaround" didn't work anymore. Some more searching on the Internet made me found this posting on glusterfs mailing list:

We had seen a similar issue and Rajesh has provided a detailed explanation on why at [1]. I'd suggest you to not to change glusterd.vol but execute "gluster volume set <volname> transport.address-family inet" to allow Gluster to listen on IPv4 by default.

Setting this option instantly fixed my issues with mounting glusterfs storages.

So, whatever is wrong with glusterfs in Debian, it seems to have something to do with IPv4 and IPv6. When disabling IPv6 in glusterfs, it works. I added information to #858495.

Kategorie: DebianTags: DebianGlusterFSSoftwareServer 

Riku Voipio: Cross-compiling with debian stretch

Planet Debian - Sat, 24/06/2017 - 17:03
Debian stretch comes with cross-compiler packages for selected architectures: $ apt-cache search cross-build-essential
crossbuild-essential-arm64 - Informational list of cross-build-essential packages for
crossbuild-essential-armel - ...
crossbuild-essential-armhf - ...
crossbuild-essential-mipsel - ...
crossbuild-essential-powerpc - ...
crossbuild-essential-ppc64el - ...

Lets have a quick exact steps guide. But first - while you can use do all this in your desktop PC rootfs, it is more wise to contain yourself. Fortunately, Debian comes with a container tool out of box:
sudo debootstrap stretch /var/lib/container/stretch http://deb.debian.org/debian
echo "strech_cross" | sudo tee /var/lib/container/stretch/etc/debian_chroot
sudo systemd-nspawn -D /var/lib/container/stretch
Then we set up cross-building enviroment for arm64 inside the container:
# Tell dpkg we can install arm64
dpkg --add-architecture arm64
# Add src line to make "apt-get source" work
echo "deb-src http://deb.debian.org/debian stretch main" >> /etc/apt/sources.list
apt-get update
# Install cross-compiler and other essential build tools
apt install --no-install-recommends build-essential crossbuild-essential-arm64
Now we have a nice build enviroment, lets choose something more complicated than the usual kernel/BusyBox to cross-build, qemu:
# Get qemu sources from debian
apt-get source qemu
cd qemu-*
# New in stretch: build-dep works in unpacked source tree
apt-get build-dep -a arm64 .
# Cross-build Qemu for arm64
dpkg-buildpackage -aarm64 -j6 -b
Now that works perfectly for Qemu. For other packages, challenges may appear. For example you may have to se "nocheck" flag to skip build-time unit tests. Or some of the build-dependencies may not be multiarch-enabled. So work continues :)

Single-player modding returns to GTA V after publisher takedown

Ars Technica - Sat, 24/06/2017 - 17:00

Enlarge / This image represents Take-Two saying "Well, I guess, there's nothing illegal here after all. Never mind that legal threat." (credit: Take-Two Interactive)

When popular Grand Theft Auto V modding tool OpenIV was taken down by a cease-and-desist request from publisher Take-Two earlier this month, the fan reaction was fast and blistering. Players bombarded Grand Theft Auto V with thousands of negative reviews on Steam, and over 77,000 people signed an online petition demanding the tool be restored.

Apparently, those gamers' cries have been heard loud and clear. As of yesterday evening, OpenIV is once again being updated and distributed by its creators.

While publisher Take-Two has been going after cheating tools in GTA Online of late, developer Rockstar long ago said it wouldn't go after Grand Theft Auto V players for using single-player mods. That's why Take-Two's sudden legal threat against the single-player-focused OpenIV earlier this month was a bit surprising, to say the least.

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Roundup: The best “escape room” games for a breakout party

Ars Technica - Sat, 24/06/2017 - 15:00

Enlarge / Some typical escape room components—plus a "Chrono Decoder"—from Escape Room: The Game. (credit: Spinmaster)

Welcome to Ars Cardboard, our weekend look at tabletop games! Check out our complete board gaming coverage at cardboard.arstechnica.com—and let us know what you think.

I don't know CPR. I can't tie a tourniquet. But I can work my way out of a locked, puzzle-stuffed room in 60 minutes or less.

I've been honing this vital skill over the last year as the current mania for physical "escape rooms" has made its way to the tabletop. In an escape room, a team of players works together to solve codes and puzzles that will eventually provide a means of escape. Usually this requires organizing a group, traveling to a physical location, and paying a significant per-person fee.

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Persona 3’s ending made me appreciate all of life’s little endings

Ars Technica - Sat, 24/06/2017 - 15:00

Enlarge / It's hard to tell from this promo image, but this game is a poignant meditation on friendship and death.

It was easier for me to walk away from Persona 3 than I expected. The game about nine friends and a dog—which celebrates its tenth anniversary in the States this year—follows a similar arc to most role-playing games. That means the gang of plucky young people ultimately saves the world. Yet its 21st century characters and setting made Persona 3 far more relatable and endearing to me than the high-flying heroes of Final Fantasy or Chrono Trigger. It helps, too, that this was the series' first game to sport a now-signature blend of dating sim and turn-based dungeon crawling.

Playing Persona 3, I felt I was experiencing the first game designed to let me take my time. Whether that meant meeting up with a friend for kendo practice or hanging out with a couple of elderly used booksellers, there was nearly always something more digestible, recognizable, and less world-shatteringly urgent to do than fighting gods and monsters. It's the kind of stuff that let me inhabit a game's world for a bit rather than simply tour through it. Tearing up specters and saving the Earth from supernatural threats is fun, but it’s a bit harder to relate to in a way that feels like my real life.

By the end of the game, I was nearly as attached to the city of Iwatodai and its inhabitants as I've ever been to a real place. The downside is that this made it that much harder to eventually say goodbye to those virtual sights I saw and friends I made along the way. What made that goodbye easier was a special, quiet message before the closing credits—one that reminds me how to accept the end of comfort and friendship even today.

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Norbert Preining: Calibre 3 for Debian

Planet Debian - Sat, 24/06/2017 - 04:42

I have updated my Calibre Debian repository to include packages of the current Calibre 3.1.1. As with the previous packages, I kept RAR support in to allow me to read comic books. I also have forwarded my changes to the maintainer of Calibre in Debian so maybe we will have soon official packages, too.

The repository location hasn’t changed, see below.

deb http://www.preining.info/debian/ calibre main deb-src http://www.preining.info/debian/ calibre main

The releases are signed with my Debian key 0x6CACA448860CDC13

Enjoy

Does US have right to data on overseas servers? We’re about to find out

Ars Technica - Sat, 24/06/2017 - 03:26

Enlarge / Microsoft in Dublin, Ireland. (credit: Red Agenda)

The Justice Department on Friday petitioned the US Supreme Court to step into an international legal thicket, one that asks whether US search warrants extend to data stored on foreign servers. The US government says it has the legal right, with a valid court warrant, to reach into the world's servers with the assistance of the tech sector, no matter where the data is stored.

The request for Supreme Court intervention concerns a 4-year-old legal battle between Microsoft and the US government over data stored on Dublin, Ireland servers. The US government has a valid warrant for the e-mail as part of a drug investigation. Microsoft balked at the warrant, and convinced a federal appeals court that US law does not apply to foreign data.

The government on Friday told the justices that US law allows it to get overseas data, and national security was at risk.

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32TB of Windows 10 beta builds, driver source code leaked [Updated]

Ars Technica - Sat, 24/06/2017 - 01:15

Enlarge (credit: Rural Learning Center)

32TB of unreleased, private Windows 10 builds, along with source code for certain parts of the driver stack, have been leaked to BetaArchive, reports The Register.

The dump appears to contain a number of Windows 10 builds from the development of codenamed Redstone 2. Redstone 2 was released earlier this year, branded as the Creators Update.

Some of these builds are built for 64-bit ARM chips, and some are said to include private debug symbols. Microsoft routinely releases debug symbols for Windows; the symbols contain additional information not found in the compiled Windows binaries that helps software developers identify which functions their code is calling. The symbols normally released are public symbols; while they identify many (though not all) functions and data structures, they don't contain information about each function's variables or parameters. The private symbols, in contrast, contain much more extensive information, giving much more insight into what each piece of code is doing and how it's doing it.

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Joachim Breitner: The perils of live demonstrations

Planet Debian - Sat, 24/06/2017 - 00:54

Yesterday, I was giving a talk at the The South SF Bay Haskell User Group about how implementing lock-step simulation is trivial in Haskell and how Chris Smith and me are using this to make CodeWorld even more attractive to students. I gave the talk before, at Compose::Conference in New York City earlier this year, so I felt well prepared. On the flight to the West Coast I slightly extended the slides, and as I was too cheap to buy in-flight WiFi, I tested them only locally.

So I arrived at the offices of Target1 in Sunnyvale, got on the WiFi, uploaded my slides, which are in fact one large interactive CodeWorld program, and tried to run it. But I got a type error…

Turns out that the API of CodeWorld was changed just the day before:

commit 054c811b494746ec7304c3d495675046727ab114 Author: Chris Smith <cdsmith@gmail.com> Date: Wed Jun 21 23:53:53 2017 +0000 Change dilated to take one parameter. Function is nearly unused, so I'm not concerned about breakage. This new version better aligns with standard educational usage, in which "dilation" means uniform scaling. Taken as a separate operation, it commutes with rotation, and preserves similarity of shapes, neither of which is true of scaling in general.

Ok, that was quick to fix, and the CodeWorld server started to compile my code, and compiled, and aborted. It turned out that my program, presumably the larges CodeWorld interaction out there, hit the time limit of the compiler.

Luckily, Chris Smith just arrived at the venue, and he emergency-bumped the compiler time limit. The program compiled and I could start my presentation.

Unfortunately, the biggest blunder was still awaiting for me. I came to the slide where two instances of pong are played over a simulated network, and my point was that the two instances are perfectly in sync. Unfortunately, they were not. I guess it did support my point that lock-step simulation can easily go wrong, but it really left me out in the rain there, and I could not explain it – I did not modify this code since New York, and there it worked flawless2. In the end, I could save my face a bit by running the real pong game against an attendee over the network, and no desynchronisation could be observed there.

Today I dug into it and it took me a while, and it turned out that the problem was not in CodeWorld, or the lock-step simulation code discussed in our paper about it, but in the code in my presentation that simulated the delayed network messages; in some instances it would deliver the UI events in different order to the two simulated players, and hence cause them do something different. Phew.

  1. Yes, the retail giant. Turns out that they have a small but enthusiastic Haskell-using group in their IT department.

  2. I hope the video is going to be online soon, then you can check for yourself.

BlackBerry’s no-phone business model isn’t working out as planned

Ars Technica - Fri, 23/06/2017 - 22:16

Enlarge / Hardly anyone is buying these. (credit: Crackberry)

BlackBerry Ltd, the company that once led the world's "smartphone" market and ruled the corporate mobile e-mail world, posted its financials today for the most recent three months, and they were not pretty. Software and professional services sales were down by 4.7 percent, totaling $101 million for the quarter, and as a result the company missed analyst expectations for revenue by a wide mark.

The news comes as a blow to investors, who had pumped up the price of BlackBerry's stock by about 60 percent over the past three months—largely because people were so bullish on BlackBerry's software sales exploding. Today, the company's share price fell by over 12 percent before close. In fact, the company only turned a profit because of a $940 million payment from Qualcomm to settle arbitration over royalty payments.

In 2016, BlackBerry completely outsourced manufacturing of its phones. Since then, revenues from phone sales have collapsed—totaling $37 million for the quarter ending May 31, compared to $152 million last year.

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Scientific research piracy site hit with $15 million fine

Ars Technica - Fri, 23/06/2017 - 22:06

Alexandra Elbakyan. (credit: Alexandra Elbakyan)

The operator of a searchable piracy site for scientific research papers has been ordered to pay $15 million as fallout from a US copyright infringement lawsuit brought by one of the world's leading scientific publishers, New York-based Elsevier.

The award doesn't mean the six-year-old Sci-Hub site is shuttering, though, despite being ordered to do so. The site has been engaged in a game of domain Whac-a-Mole ever since the case was filed in New York federal court nearly two years ago. And it doesn't mean that the millions of dollars in damages will get paid, either. The developer of the Pirate Bay-like site for academic research—Alexandra Elbakyan of Russia—has repeatedly said she wouldn't pay any award. She didn't participate in the court proceedings, either. US District Judge Robert Sweet issued a default judgement (PDF) against the site this week, but Sci-Hub remains online.

Elsevier markets itself as a leading provider of science, medical, and health "information solutions." The infringing activity is of its subscription database called "ScienceDirect." Elsevier claims ScienceDirect is "home to almost one-quarter of the world's peer-reviewed, full-text scientific, technical, and medical content."

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Obama reportedly ordered implants to be deployed in key Russian networks

Ars Technica - Fri, 23/06/2017 - 21:51

Enlarge (credit: Wikimedia Commons/Maria Joner)

In his final days as the 44th president of the United States, Barack Obama authorized a covert hacking operation to implant attack code in sensitive Russian networks. The revelation came in an 8,000-word article The Washington Post published Friday that recounted a secret struggle to punish the Kremlin for tampering with the 2016 election.

According to Friday's article, the move came some four months after a top-secret Central Intelligence Agency report detailed Russian President Vladimir Putin's direct involvement in a hacking campaign aimed at disrupting or discrediting the presidential race. Friday's report also said that intelligence captured Putin's specific objective that the operation defeat or at least damage Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton and help her Republican rival Donald Trump. The Washington Post said its reports were based on accounts provided by more than three dozen current and former US officials in senior positions in government, most of whom spoke on the condition of anonymity.

In the months that followed the August CIA report, 17 intelligence agencies confirmed with high confidence the Russian interference. After months of discussions with various advisors, Obama enacted a series of responses, including shutting down two Russian compounds, sanctioning nine Russian entities and individuals, and expelling 35 Russian diplomats from the US. All of those measures have been known for months. The Post, citing unnamed US officials, said Obama also authorized a covert hacking program that involved the National Security Agency, the CIA, and the US Cyber Command. According to Friday's report:

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Joey Hess: PV array is hot

Planet Debian - Fri, 23/06/2017 - 21:43

Only took a couple hours to wire up and mount the combiner box.

Something about larger wiring like this is enjoyable. So much less fiddly than what I'm used to.

And the new PV array is hot!

Update: The panels have an open circuit voltage of 35.89 and are in strings of 2, so I'd expect to see 71.78 V with only my multimeter connected. So I'm losing 0.07 volts to wiring, which is less than I designed for.

Medical records join revenge porn, credit card numbers for Google removal

Ars Technica - Fri, 23/06/2017 - 21:21

Enlarge (credit: Getty | Chris Ryan)

Alphabet Inc.'s Google has now added personal medical records to the list of things it’s willing to remove from search results upon request.

Starting this week, individuals can ask Google to delete from search results “confidential, personal medical records of private people” that have been posted without consent. The quiet move, reported by Bloomberg, adds medical records to the short list of things that Google polices, including revenge porn, sites containing content that violates copyright laws, and those with personal financial information, including credit card numbers.

The policy change appears aptly timed. Earlier this month, a congressionally mandated task force—The Health Care Industry Cybersecurity Task Force report—reported that all aspects of health IT security are in critical condition. And last month, the WannaCry ransomware worm affected 65 hospitals in the UK.

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Windows 10 S security brought down by, of course, Word macros

Ars Technica - Fri, 23/06/2017 - 21:11

Enlarge / The Windows 10 S default wallpaper is a rather attractive simplified version of the Windows 10 default wallpaper. (credit: Microsoft)

The major premise justifying Windows 10 S, the new variant of Windows 10 that can only install and run applications from the Windows Store, is that by enforcing such a restriction, Windows 10 S can—like iOS and Chrome OS—offer greater robustness and consistency than regular Windows. For example, as Microsoft has recently written, apps from the Windows Store can't include unwanted malicious software within their installers, eliminating the bundled spyware that has been a regular part of the Windows software ecosystem.

If Windows 10 S can indeed provide much stronger protection against bad actors—both external ones trying to hack and compromise PCs and internal ones, such as schoolkids—then its restrictions represent a reasonable trade-off. The downside is that you can't run arbitrary Windows software; the upside is that you can't run arbitrary Windows malware. That might not be the right trade-off for every Windows user, but it's almost surely the right one for some.

But if that protection is flawed—if the bad guys can somehow circumvent it—then the value of Windows 10 S is substantially undermined. The downside for typical users will remain, as there still won't be any easy and straightforward way to install and run arbitrary Windows software. But the upside, the protection against malware, will evaporate.

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Scroogled no more: Gmail won’t scan e-mails for ads personalization

Ars Technica - Fri, 23/06/2017 - 20:09

Enlarge / Microsoft's description of Gmail scanning from the "Scroogled" ad campaign. (credit: Microsoft)

Google has announced it will no longer scan e-mail messages for ad personalization. Previously, in the consumer version of Gmail, Google's computers would scan the contents of every e-mail message to determine a relevant ad to show. The scanning "feature" has been turned off for Google Apps for Education and GSuite accounts for some time, but now Google says that "consumer Gmail content will not be used or scanned for any ads personalization after this change."

In its blog post, Google says, "This decision brings Gmail ads in line with how we personalize ads for other Google products. Ads shown are based on users’ settings. Users can change those settings at any time, including disabling ads personalization." Presumably Google means Gmail will now honor the account-wide "Ads personalization" setting, which is available at https://www.google.com/settings/u/0/ads/authenticated.

Gmail's scanning has long drawn ire from the tech community. It was the subject of a lawsuit alleging the the feature violated wiretapping and privacy laws, which eventually resulted in Google turning scanning off for students. Google has also been sued by non-Gmail users over the feature. That lawsuit claims that non-users that e-mail Gmail users should not have their e-mails scanned. The feature has also been the subject of Microsoft's "Scroogled" campaign.

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How the STRONGER Patents Act Would Send Innovation Overseas

EFF Breaking News - Fri, 23/06/2017 - 19:49

Senator Chris Coons introduced a bill this week called the STRONGER Patents Act [PDF]. The bill contains many terrible ideas. It would gut inter partes review (a valuable tool for challenging bad patents). It would overturn the Supreme Court’s decision in eBay v. Mercexchange (thereby allowing patent trolls to get injunctions to shut down productive companies, even though the patent infringed is only on a tiny piece of the larger product). Perhaps most strikingly, the bill includes a provision that would discourage companies from doing research and development in the United States. The STRONGER Patents Act shows how far the certain patent owners are willing to go to serve their narrow interests at the expense of everyone else. 

The general rule in patent law is that each country has its own patent system. This means that companies can only be found liable for infringing a U.S. patent for manufacturing or sales that occur within the United States. The Supreme Court has issued a number of sensible decisions affirming this rule. Senator Coons’ bill would upend this principle by making companies liable for foreign sales whenever they conducted the research and development for that product in the U.S.

Section 108(3)(A) of the bill says:

Whoever, without authority, supplies or causes to be supplied in or from the United States a design for a product embodying a patented invention in such manner as to actively induce the making of that product outside the United States in a manner that would infringe the patent if made in the United States, shall be liable as an infringer. 

In plain English, this means that if you design a product in the U.S., you can be sued for sales around the world. Worse, a separate provision the bill would have this rule apply even if you independently invented your product, and had no idea you were infringing a patent.

To see the impact of this provision, we can consider how it would apply to fabless semiconductor companies based in Austin, Texas or Austria. The Austin company designs chips in Texas then has them manufactured in Taiwan and sold around the world. The Austrian company designs chips in Salzburg then has them manufactured in Taiwan and sold around the world. If these chips are found to infringe a U.S. patent, the Austin company would be liable for all of its global sales. The Austrian company, however, could be found liable only for its U.S. sales. In this way, Coons’ proposal punishes the Austin company for investing in research and development in the United States.

You might think that the STRONGER Patents Act balances this big disincentive to innovate in the U.S. by making U.S. patents stronger. But that is wrong. You do not need to perform research and development in the U.S. to get a U.S. patent. As long as you meet the criteria for getting a patent, it doesn’t matter if your laboratory is in Austin or Austria. Indeed, in recent years more than half of issued U.S. patents were of foreign origin.

Under Senator Coons’ proposal, the most sensible business model is to do research outside the United States. Foreign companies will have their overseas sales protected. Yet they can still get U.S. patents and use those patents to attack the global sales of U.S.-based companies. As Josh Landau suggests at Patent Progress, it’s hard to think of a more effective way to use patent policy to convince companies to shift their investment in research and development overseas.

Patent owners often insist, without evidence, that “stronger” patents will always mean more innovation. The STONGER Patents Act shows why that is not true. The bill would “strengthen” the U.S. patent system in ways that actively discourages doing research and development here. It makes this choice solely to benefit patent owners. We hope that Congress rejects the terrible ideas in the STRONGER Patents Act and turns to patent reform that would actually promote innovation.

Dealmaster: Get a Dell XPS tower or an Inspiron desktop with monitor for just $499

Ars Technica - Fri, 23/06/2017 - 19:45

Greetings, Arsians! Courtesy of our partners at TechBargains, we're back with a bunch of new deals to share before the weekend begins. Of note are two great deals priced at $499: you can get either a Dell XPS tower PC, complete with a Core i5 processor and 2GB Nvidia GPU, or a Dell Inspiron 3650 desktop with a Core i5 Skylake CPU and a 22-inch Dell LED monitor. Both deals are great if you're in need of a new at-home PC, so snag the one you like best while you can.

Check out the full list of deals below.

Featured

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SpaceX completes first half of its weekend doubleheader

Ars Technica - Fri, 23/06/2017 - 19:30

Enlarge / SpaceX successfully test-fired its rocket for the BulgariaSat-1 mission last week. (credit: SpaceX)

3:30pm ET Update: Under nearly perfect skies in Florida, SpaceX successfully launched the BulgariaSat-1 on its way to geostationary transfer orbit Friday afternoon. The "flight proven" booster made its second flight, and provides further indication that reusable rocketry isn't going to be an aerospace fad. It is, rather, likely the future.

The company also demonstrated its increasing proficiency with regard to booster landings. Although Elon Musk didn't provide technical details, he said the reentry force and heating faced by this booster would be greater than that of any previous flight. Despite this technically challenging, three-engine landing, the rocket made it back to a droneship in the Atlantic Ocean.

The first-stage booster was singed, smoking and listing—and near the edge of the droneship. But the rocket had made it home in one piece. "Rocket is extra toasty and hit the deck hard (used almost all of the emergency crush core), but otherwise good," Musk tweeted a few minutes following the landing.

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[$] ProofMode: a camera app for verifiable photography

LWN.net - Fri, 23/06/2017 - 17:55
The default apps on a mobile platform like Android are familiar targets for replacement, especially for developers concerned about security. But while messaging and voice apps (which can be replaced by Signal and Ostel, for instance) may be the best known examples, the non-profit Guardian Project has taken up the cause of improving the security features of the camera app. Its latest such project is ProofMode, an app to let users take photos and videos that can be verified as authentic by third parties.
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